Captain America Sequel Directors Talk Sharon Carter & more news

By on February 17, 2014

Captain America: The Winter Soldier may have set Scarlett Johansson’s super-spy Black Widow up as the leading lady – and there’s rumours of romance – but fans of the comic know to look out for new character Sharon Carter, aka Agent 13.

Played by Emily VanCamp from TV’s Revenge, Sharon is a relation of khaki-clad OSS badass Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell), who was all set to become Steve’s wartime sweetheart in the first film. In the comics, the pair share a passionate on-off relationship, but speaking exclusively to SciFiNow in the new issue co-director Joe Russo says they’re taking things slow.

“We introduce her as a character in this movie, but it’s sort of a soft introduction,” says the director. “There’s definitely the budding of [a romance], but it’s something that’s more left to future storytellers.”

Those future storytellers may well be Joe and Anthony Russo, who are already developing a threequel for Marvel, although it won’t be officially greenlit until The Winter Soldier‘s opening weekend is in. In a deleted scene on the Avengers Assemble DVD and Blu-ray release, we learned that she is still alive – adding a whole new element to any future love triangle the Russo brothers want to play around with in Captain America 3.

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Composer Henry Jackman discusses scoring the Russo brothers’ Captain America: The Winter Soldier with HeyUGuys, which is currently being touted as possibly being the greatest Marvel Studios film to date. On crafting the score, Jackman stated:

“The score I’ve done recently, Captain America … The reason I like it particularly is because it’s 50% production and all the tricks I’ve learnt from spending years in the record industry but then it’s also got the kind of injection of symphonic, thematic, heroic music that all kind of merges into one musical, and hopefully coherent piece. You need a sort of perfect storm of circumstances to allow something radical to work in a film where you’re not just being self-conscious, where you’re not just trying to show off or whatever, and this [Captain America] was it. I can’t say too much because I know Marvel will shoot me, but Captain America: The Winter Soldier is a brilliant film that is part of the Marvel franchise but the directors John and Anthony Russo are geniuses. It’s a Marvel film that’s taking it one step further. They’ve made Captain America much more contemporary. The story is set in 2013, so it’s not a period film and it doesn’t have Indiana Jones style Nazis running around the place, it’s all set in the modern era and it’s a cross between a superhero and a modern political thriller so that’s already awesome.”

Jackman further talks about the themes and tones in the film and how that helped him craft the score:

“What’s great about that is because it’s a Captain America film you need these traditional, thematic elements which eventually come through in act three of the film, but also the film is super-contemporary. Plus, Winter Soldier is this crazy, dark, RoboCop-type figure who is somewhat human but mechanised, completely messed up. Slightly human but completely tortured and completely manipulated, but crucially mechanised. So I said you know what, I’m gonna do something completely crazy and dark for the Winter Soldier, and I’m just gonna go for it. I hadn’t worked with these directors before, and away from picture I just wrote a suite for the Winter Soldier that was about six or seven minutes long that I spent ages on and treated it like a record. The idea being that if I get this vibe right, if I nail this six or seven minute thing which I think is the essence of the character and it’s super radical and it’s not that traditional and not completely orchestral because I want to save some of that for Captain America, let’s just see what these guys say. I played it for them really loud, and after they were finished there was a bit of a silence, and then Joe [Russo] went “I love it! Awesome!”

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In Marvel’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier fans will get to see multiples of the 2.0 version of the helicarrier as well as S.H.I.E.L.D. headquarters based in a building called the Triskelion in Washington, D.C. The Triskelion is a newly designed design, state-of- the-art facility that fits seamlessly into the backdrop of Washington.

Chris Evans truly had mixed martial arts training for Marvel’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier as the fighting techniques he employed in the film were a mixture of parkour, Brazilian jiu jitsu, karate and boxing. The filmmakers believed that bringing Steve Rogers into the modern day also meant that he had studied and mastered modern fighting styles and techniques.

With an acrobatic approach to fighting being featured in the film, Chris Evans willingly engaged in gymnastics training. That training had a big payoff for Evans when it came time to shoot fight sequences like the elevator fight.

The elevator fight was the first fight sequence shot for the film. It featured Brock Rumlow and ten guys in a crowded elevator with Captain America. The challenge was how much choreography could the filmmakers squeeze into a very small space. Realizing that Steve Rogers would have to be on the defensive, the stunt coordinators let Chris Evans use his hands and feet in close quarters until he gets a bit more room to use his fighting techniques and do some serious damage.

Sebastian Stan, who plays the Winter Soldier, also went through rigorous fight and weapons training. He took a lot of good-natured ribbing from his friends because he would walk around all day practicing his moves with a plastic knife because he wanted his movements to feel natural.

In Marvel’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Captain America gets a new ‘stealth’ suit — a navy blue, utilitarian-looking suit that moves fluidly. Since Captain America is working in special ops in the new film, it was only logical that he would not be wearing a target on his chest when on clandestine missions. So the filmmakers opted for a suit that would have texture and look more real world with a Kevlar-based ballistic component that would protect Captain America but at the same time function like a military uniform.

The filmmakers were interested in adding more of a tactical design to the Falcon costume than was represented in the comic books. Accordingly, they incorporated a lot of real-world webbing, straps and gear. The final result was a costume that retained the iconic parts of the Falcon costume but stripped away the more comic book elements that would not work in the modern day. The Falcon costume takes actor Anthony Mackie 25 minutes to put on.

Anthony Mackie did quite a bit of wirework flying as Falcon. The stunt coordinators would fly him 70 feet up in the air and land him precisely on a little tape mark so he could walk right out of the wires and into the scene. Luckily for all involved, Mackie is athletic and highly coordinated, which made everyone’s job easier.

Anthony Mackie, whose excitement and energy for his character was infectious, liked to say ‘cut the check!’ whenever something had gone right or a scene had been completed. It became a contagious phrase that caught on and before long everyone on set was saying it.

Shooting in Washington D.C. put Steve Rogers, Black Widow and Falcon in scenes at some of the most prominent national landmarks, including the Jefferson Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, National Air and Space Museum, Capitol Building, National Mall, Occidental Restaurant at The Willard Hotel, DuPont Circle Neighborhood and the Theodore Roosevelt Bridge, which the production shut down for the first time ever for the filming of a major motion picture.

For the actors, shooting on the streets of Washington, D.C. meant drawing big crowds — many of them young kids who lined the streets dressed in their Captain America costumes, waiting to meet Captain America himself. Chris Evans routinely took photos with young fans and he describes those moments as the best part of shooting in the nation’s capitol and playing Captain America.

In battling the Winter Soldier, Captain America needs all the resources he can get, including his iconic shield, which has a lot more uses in the film. The shield is traditionally used mostly as a defensive weapon, but in Captain America: The Winter Soldier the filmmakers wanted to explore using it more as an offensive weapon. There are two handles on the shield and Steve Rogers can hold onto the handles in order to utilize it in an eastern style of fighting.

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